Boogie - WII - Preview

Given the Wii’s quirky controller, a game like Boogie seems like a no-brainer, but one that makes you surprised that no one else has thought of until now. Being published by EA, Boogie is a song and dance sim where the player must do one of two things: either wave the controller around to make their on-screen avatars dance to the music, or sing karaoke through a microphone peripheral while your avatar dances. Boogie is shaping up to be a fun game that will be easy for young and old to get into, but ultimately rewarding to those who get good at it.

In Boogie’s dance mode, basically every move that you make with the controller and the nunchuck will register. While the actual moves are still in the tweaking process at the moment, the initial idea is that you’ll be able to move the controller up, down, left, right and twist it like a screwdriver in order to make your character bounce and gyrate to the music. You use the nunchuck to control your upper body, bouncing your head to the beat.

Boogie Wii screenshots

Moves can be modified with the A button, allowing you to perform different moves and change things up a bit. You get more points for staying on the beat of the music, which will help build up your Boogie Meter, which will allow you to perform combos and earn a ton of points. You can also pick up point modifiers around the environment by stepping with the d-pad.

The other side of Boogie’s gameplay coin is the karaoke portion. This mode feels like any other karaoke situation, with the lyrics being lit on the bottom of the screen and you singing along into a microphone to wordless music. You’re scored like in other karaoke games, based on how well you stick on the beat and hit the pitch.

Boogie Wii screenshots

The one thing that made it a bit different is the Voice Assist. Since you’re singing into a mic, your voice will go through the speakers, so others can hear how good (or bad) you sing. However, if you’re shy about the way you sound, you can turn on Voice Assist, which will replace your voice as it comes through the television with the voice of whomever happens to really be singing the song. For example, whereas my singing voice typically sounds like a cat attacking a chalkboard, once the Voice Assist was on, I sounded exactly like Lionel Richie in a particularly stirring rendition of the Commodore’s “Brick House”. I seriously contemplated taking my act on the road.

Among the elements planned for Boogie are the ability to save dance and song performances and sync them together, and customize your avatar with new bling and clothes. Boogie should be another showcase for the Wii as a title that anyone from your girlfriend to your grandma could play and have a great time.

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