The 100 Best Movies of the 2000's: The Top Ten

We made it!  The last ten!  These movies I feel epitomize what movie making is all about. None of these movies should be missed, even if you're not a fan of the genre. They're just that good! So enough chit chat, here are the top ten movies of the 2000s!

Get caught up:


10. No Country for Old Men (Coen Brothers, 2007)

No Country for Old Men

Just a forewarning:  Three of the films in my top ten are by the Coen Brothers.  Why?  Because they have a totally unique voice, as well as being wildly consistent.  There was no way that them adapting a Cormac McCarthy book wasn’t gonna be awesome.  By making bold moves (like totally dispensing with a soundtrack or score, the Coens managed to create a singularly suspenseful film, each silence fraught with horrible possibility.  Throw in Javier Bardem as the terrifying, unstoppable killer Anton Chigurgh, and you’ve got an amazing, super-tense thriller that isn’t afraid to tackle weighty themes.  And it’s my third favorite film by them in 12 years, which is crazy.

9. A Serious Man (Coen Brothe‚Äčrs, 2009)

Serious Man

See?  Here they are again.  Those darn Coen Brothers.  It’s tempting to say that A Serious Man is nothing like No Country, but thematically they are somewhat similar. They both tackle existentialist themes like life, purpose, and inevitability.   A Serious Man, though, is also hilarious.

Definitely the most Jewish movie I’ve ever seen, it follows Larry Gopnik as he tries to figure out why his life has suddenly gone to hell.  The film piles misfortune after misfortune upon Larry, as he desperately searches for answers.  What makes the film so great, though, is that the Coens aren’t nearly as interested in the answers as they are in the questions.

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Eric Zipper Eric Zipper is a writer and comedian living in Los Angeles. When he's not making you laugh, playing video games, or watching movies, he's probably sleeping. Follow him on Twitter @erzip
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