25 PlayStation 2 Games You Shouldn’t Be Without (#10 - #6)

Here we go! We're at the first half of the top ten games that have to be part of your PS2 library. Make sure to check back tomorrow to see which games made it into the top five!

Missed our previous post? Get caught up here: #25 - #21 #20 - #16 #15 - #11

10. Twisted Metal Black (SCEA)


David Jaffe has been working on Twisted Metal games for some time, but up until the point of Black’s release, they’ve been pretty tame, sitting in Teen-rated territory. But then this mature-rated sequel changed all that, introducing a new asylum filled with crazy types who couldn’t wait to compete in Calypso’s tournament, including a boy who befriends a corpse and, of course, the maniacal, fire-headed Sweet Tooth. But story isn’t the focus here – the shooting and driving action is as amazing as ever, and the visuals definitely brought the dark to the PS2, as you ran over innocent civilians and brought bosses, such as a heavily armed helicopter and a roving dump truck, to their rusty knees. The upcoming sequel, due in 2012 for PS3, will definitely have a lot to offer fans nowadays, but in the meantime, pass some time by getting into Black. You won’t be sorry.

9. Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (Ubisoft)


When Prince of Persia made its big comeback on the PlayStation 2 – complete with series creator Jordan Mechner in tow – we were absolutely thrilled. Not only did the game retain its classic flavor of puzzle solving and hack-and-slash swordplay, but it introduced some outstanding new fundamentals in combat, including new acrobatic moves (you could flip over enemies and subdue them from behind) and wall-running. This made the flow between levels run smoother than any Prince of Persia game before it, and also worked wonders for the following sequels, Warrior Within and The Two Princes. Still, nothing beats the original. If for some reason you can’t find a copy (either the original or the one with the reworked cover art), you can download an HD version on PlayStation Network.

8. ICO (SCEA)


Even after all these years of playing it, we still don’t get some parts of Team Ico’s breathtaking platforming/puzzle game. We can’t understand what your female friend is saying, we’re still trying to figure out some parts of the ending, and some puzzles – well, we don’t know if we can tackle them the same way again. But that’s the kind of game that really knows how to intrigue you, and that’s why ICO made the list. It’s an outstanding game, one that has an exquisite art style that’s all its own and great puzzles to solve over the course of a few hours. This one’s become a collector’s item on eBay, but don’t fret. It’ll be released as part of a Team Ico HD package on PS3 in late September. For $40, no less. Great deal.

7. Okami (Capcom)


ICO wasn’t the only game that defined the PlayStation 2 with a unique art style. Take Okami, one of Capcom’s most visually stunning efforts to date. You play the role of Amaterasu, a spiritual being who needs to set things right in a tormented world. You do so with some great combat skills, along with the help of a Celestial Brush to fill in the blanks. The story is very well done for a game of this nature, but nothing beats playing through it and watching everything unfold. Even jumping has its moments, as you land and a field of flowers automatically generates at your feet. This is one you definitely need to add to your collection – especially since we may never see a sequel. Sigh.

6. Burnout 3: Takedown (Electronic Arts)


When Acclaim dissolved, we thought that Criterion Software was going down with it, and we feared the worst. However, Electronic Arts wisely picked up the racing developer, and were promptly rewarded with one of the most vigorous free-wheeling games around, Burnout 3: Takedown. The game introduces a competitive nature to driving, as you have to literally bash cars off the road to guarantee a first place victory. Along with great single races, you can also take on the racers in Road Rage, crashing as many cars as possible; or set up incredible Crash scenarios, clocking up millions of dollars in damage and competing with others. This is one of the best racing games for this generation, and we keep hoping we’ll get a Takedown sequel that lives up to it. Maybe some day…

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Robert Workman
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