news\ Sep 16, 2016 at 10:06 am

Even Sony's President thinks Sean Murray over promised No Man's Sky

But he's still happy with the game.

Prior to the release of No Man's Sky, if you offered any criticism on the game you'd have been hit with dozens of messages detailing how you were, for lack of a better word, an idiot. After the game released, the hype train came to a stop.

No Man's Sky's release was not met with overall applause, but with claims of false advertisement from the game's creator Sean Murray and bugs that lead to quite a few players either refunding the game or simply quitting it.

With all the criticism, you'd think that the No Man's Sky developers would have come out and said something, but no - that didn't happen. Sony President Shuhei Yoshida has broken the silence on the game and pretty much the same thing that everyone else was say: Sean Murray promised too much and he didn't have any PR person to hold him back or help him.

"I understand some of the criticisms especially Sean Murray is getting, because he sounded like he was promising more features in the game from day one,” Shuhei Yoshida told Eurogamer (via MCV). 

"It wasn't a great PR strategy, because he didn't have a PR person helping him, and in the end he is an indie developer. But he says their plan is to continue to develop No Man's Sky features and such, and I'm looking forward to continuing to play the game."

Regardless of the criticism, No Man's Sky did tremendously well in sales and was the top selling PlayStation 4 game in August. Yoshida doesn't believe that the game damaged the PlayStation brand, mostly because he's happy with its sales.

"I am super happy with the game actually, and I'm amazed with the sales the game has gotten, so I'm not the right person to judge if it has 'harmed' the PlayStation brand.”

There you have it.

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